At #ISTE2014, Process Over Product Prevails

If you listen closely to the conversations taking place at ISTE2014, you will hear educators talking about BYOD, 1:1 initiatives, maker education, and more. But whether in a formal session or a chance meeting in a corridor at the Georgia World Congress Center, one common theme seems to connect what everyone is talking about. And that theme is an emphasis on process.

“This is not about technology; it’s about relationships and learning” said George Couros, Divisional Principal in Edmonton, Canada. Though Couros made this claim to attendees in his session, Conquering the Myths of Technology, the atmosphere at this year’s ISTE conference seems to reflect this idea generally.

From successful implementation of technology in the classroom to navigating this year’s conference itself, process before product prevails.

“The biggest shift for educators using technology is not skill set; it’s mindset,” added Couros.

Apparent by the interactions of conference-goers is a focus on continuing to develop the correct mindset to support blended learning in their respective positions as stakeholders in education, whether that be as a teacher, administrator, or policymaker.

So, what do teachers at ISTE2014 need to help them embark on the process of learning how to leverage technology in their own blended learning practices?

Robert Tellgren Tweeted, “Time. The message that I keep hearing is that teachers need time to try things out in their classrooms.”

Regardless of how powerful of lessons educators may learn this at ISTE2014, without time, there’s no process. But then again, when process is framed by relationships and learning like it has been this year at the conference in Atlanta, educators at ISTE aren’t wasting one minute.

Read the entire article by Dave Guymon on Getting Smart at http://gettingsmart.com/2014/06/iste2014-process-product-prevails/

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